Introduction to Glasgow

On the west coast of Scotland, Glasgow is steeped in history and culture, attracting a rapidly increasing number of visitors from across the world. The city grows at an impressive rate every year, adapting to the needs of travellers by offering an exceptional range of entertainment, shopping venues, Victorian and contemporary buildings along with a vibrant nightlife. The proud working-class city is known for its no-nonsense, tell it how it is attitude, which is refreshing and lets tourists see and, more importantly, experience the real side of Scotlands largest city.

Glasgow caters for all tastes and combines its history with a modern edge, making for an eye-opening experience. The River Clyde flows through the central area of the city and is home to a brilliant multi-billion-pound waterfront district complete with bars, restaurants, museums and accommodation lining the banks. Glasgow takes pride in being home to a number of interesting museums and art galleries with pieces dating back hundreds of years and ultra-modern exhibitions. Kelvingrove Gallery is one of the most popular free entry attractions and holds extensive collections of natural history, armoury and art totalling around 8,000 objects.

Music lovers will also be well catered for in Glasgow with a vast number of acts playing both on the streets and on quirky indoor stages. Its well known that Glasgow venues continue to play an important role in the development of the city's sound with famed local bands like Franz Ferdinand. The most notable venue would have to be King Tuts Wah Wah Hut, a tightly packed building with an intense atmosphere and legendary rock n roll gigs.

The city nightlife in general is just as exciting with trendy bars and clubs keeping the city up to date, yet not forgetting the old-style joints keeping the scene grounded and authentic. Both sides of the city's after-hours scene are just as enjoyable and it's all part of the overflowing fun to be had in Glasgow.

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